Jerome H. King, MA

Jerome King
Jay King

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Jay is one of the newest Principals on Far Western’s management team. He attended the University of California, Santa Cruz, for his undergraduate degree, graduating in 1991, and Simon Fraser University for his master’s degree, graduating in 1997. He has worked at Far Western since 1999. He also serves as a Principal Investigator on projects throughout California and Nevada. He specializes in information management and analysis. As a founder of our GIS and Cartography group, Jay has completed a number of landscape-level sensitivity models and geoarchaeological studies, sample survey designs, large-scale cultural resources data-acquisition and maintenance projects, as well as custom application development. As an archaeologist, he has led and contributed to a wide variety of inventory, testing, and data-recovery projects. His work with Jeff Rosenthal and Jack Meyer on the geoarchaeology of the southern Santa Clara Valley, subsequently published by the Center for Archaeological Research, Davis, received the 2005 Preservation Design Award from the California Preservation Foundation.

 

Inventory
Evaluation and Testing
Effects Mitigation
Geoarchaeology
Sensivity and Constraints
Environmental Planning Support
GIS and Cartography
Monitoring
Public Outreach and Interpretation

Jay’s Featured Projects

  • Ruby Pipeline
  • Caltrans Cultural Resources Database and Legacy Data Collection
  • Battle Mountain Pasture

Jay’s Featured Publications

Duke, Daron, and Jerome H. King

2014

A GIS Model for Predicting Wetland Habitat in the Great Basin at the Pleistocene-Holocene Transition and Implications for Paleoindian Archaeology. Journal of Archaeological Science 49:276-291.

McGuire, Kelly R., William R. Hildebrandt, Amy J. Gilreath, Jerome H. King, and John E. Berg

2013

The Prehistory of Gold Butte: A Virgin River Hinterland, Clark County, Nevada. University of Utah Anthropological Papers No. 127. Salt Lake City, Utah.

Hildebrandt, William R., and Jerome H. King

2012

Distinguishing between Darts and Arrows in the Archaeological Record: Implications for Technological Change in the American West. American Antiquity 77:789-799.

Pat Mikkelsen, MA

Far Western, Davis Office
Pat Mikkelsen

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Pat has been a Principal at Far Western since 1992 and has extensive experience in California in all aspects of cultural resources management—project scoping, budgeting, research, survey, test and data recovery excavations, report production and editing, public interpretation, district nominations, and state and federal laws and regulations. She has served as Project Manager and Principal Investigator on many long-term survey and multi-site projects, with an interest in the central coast and northeastern California. As a primary editor of Far Western documents, she focuses on quality control for smooth agency review and quick approval. Her work has been published through the San Luis Obispo Archaeological Society Publications and the Center for Archaeological Research at Davis, UC Press. She serves as editor and nomination chair for the Society of California Archaeology, and is a member of the James A. Bennyhoff Committee which supports student research.

 

Inventory
Evaluation and Testing
Effects Mitigation
Geoarchaeology
Sensivity and Constraints
Environmental Planning Support
GIS and Cartography
Monitoring
Public Outreach and Interpretation


Pat’s Key Projects

  • Caltrans Districts 5, 6 & 9
  • California Department of Parks and Recreation
  • Cuyama Valley

Pat’s Featured Publications

Mikkelsen, Patricia

2013

Temporal Components. Society for California Archaeology Proceedings 27:149-161.

Mikkelsen, Patricia, William Hildebrandt, Deborah Jones, Jeffrey Rosenthal, and Robert Gibson

2005

Thirty Years After: 1974 Excavations at Kirk Creek, CA-MNT-238, on the Big Sur Coast. Occasional Paper No. 18, San Luis Obispo County Archaeological Society San Luis Obispo, California.

Mikkelsen, Patricia, William Hildebrandt, and Deborah Jones

2000

Prehistoric Adaptations on the Shores of Morro Bay Estuary: A Report on Excavations at Site CA-SLO-165, Morro Bay, California. San Luis Obispo Archaeological Society Publications.

William R. Hildebrandt, PhD

William Hildebrandt, Far Western Anthropological Group
Bill Hildebrandt
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Dr. Hildebrandt’s archaeological research focuses on hunter-gatherer adaptations in California, Oregon, and the Great Basin. Bill is also a leader in the field of cultural resources management, and he has helped many government agencies preserve and better understand important archaeological sites under their management. His research is published in a variety of peer-reviewed journals and he has authored numerous monographs and book chapters published by the Smithsonian, American Museum of Natural History, UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC Los Angeles, University of Utah, and the Nevada State Museum. He is currently working on the evolution of prehistoric hunting patterns in California and the Great Basin, applying modern approaches of human behavioral ecology to this research effort.

Inventory
Evaluation and Testing
Effects Mitigation
Geoarchaeology
Sensivity and Constraints
Environmental Planning Support
GIS and Cartography
Monitoring
Public Outreach and Interpretation

Bill’s Featured Projects

Bill’s Featured Publications

Jones T.L., D.A. Jones, K.W. Gobalet, J.F. Porcasi, and W.R. Hildebrandt

2017

The Morro Bay Fauna: Evidence for a Medieval Droughts Refugium on the Central California Coast. American Antiquity 82 (2):203-222.

Hildebrandt, William R., and Kelly R. McGuire

2016

Large Game Hunting in the American West: A comment on Fisher’s (2015) Reassessment of the Ascendance of Hunting Debate. American Antiquity 81 (4):764-765.

Hildebrandt, W., K. McGuire, J. King, A. Ruby, and D.C. Young

2016

Prehistory of Nevada’s Northern Tier: Archaeological Investigations along the Ruby Pipeline. American Museum of Natural History Anthropological Papers, Number 101.

Bill’s Outreach Activities

  • Founding Member, Far Western Anthropological Research Group, Inc.
  • Editor of the Journal of California and Great Basin Anthropology 2013-2017
  • President, Society for California Archaeology 2018-2019
  • Research Associate, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Davis
  • Research Associate, Division of Anthropology, American Museum of Natural History.

 

Kimberley Carpenter, MA

Kim Carpenter
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Kim is the President of Far Western and, as a Principal and Project Manager, works out of the company’s Main Office in Davis. She received her B.A. from California State University, Long Beach in 1992 and her M.A. from California State University, Chico, in 1998. She has spent the last several years managing large, complex, and time-sensitive projects for our energy-sector clients. Her research interests include human adaptation as viewed through the lens of evolutionary ecology. The results of her research have been published by the Smithsonian Institution Press, American Antiquity, and the Nevada State Museum. Ms. Carpenter currently serves as Treasurer for the Great Basin Anthropological Association and is a member of the societies for American and California Archaeology.

 

Inventory
Evaluation and Testing
Effects Mitigation
Geoarchaeology
Sensivity and Constraints
Environmental Planning Support
GIS and Cartography
Monitoring
Public Outreach and Interpretation

Kim’s Key Projects

  • PG&E Cultural Resources On-Call Contract
  • Encinosa, Ulatis, and Alamo Detention Basins for the City of Vacaville
  • Lauer Dam

Kim’s Featured Publications

McGuire, Kelly R., Kimberley L. Carpenter, and Jeffery S. Rosenthal

2012

Great Basin Hunters of the Sierra Nevada. In Meeting at the margins: Prehistoric Cultural Interactions in the Intermountain West, edited by Dave Rhode, pp. 124-141. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Whitaker, Adrian R., and Kimberley L. Carpenter

2012

Economic Foraging at a Distance is Not a Question of If but When: A Response to Grimstead. American Antiquity. 77(1):160-167.

Hildebrandt, William R., and Kimberley Carpenter

2011

Native Hunting Adaptations in California: Changing Patterns of Resource Use from the Early Holocene to European Contact. In Indigenous Subsistence Economies of North America, edited by Bruce Smith, pp. 131-146. Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, Washington, DC.